Where do you put the apostrophe in others?

Where do you put the apostrophe in others?

The rule is that “each” will always be followed by a singular. “John and Mary promised to love each other forever. They agreed to take care of each other’s wellbeing above all else.” The apostrophe is used to indicate possession, and it comes before the s, not after it.

What is the difference between others and others?

We can use other as a pronoun. As a pronoun, other has a plural form, others: We have to solve this problem, more than any other, today. I’ll attach two photos to this email and I’ll send others tomorrow.

Are each others possessive?

If you remember that everything in front of the apostrophe has to be a word, you know that it cannot be each others’ because there is no such word as each others. There is just one person involved. It is always singular possessive.

How do we use each others?

We use each other and one another to show that each person in a group of two or more people does something to the others. There is very little difference between each other and one another and we can normally use them in the same places. Each other is more common than one another: Rick and Gina never liked each other.

What is the possessive of others?

Other’s is the correct possessive singular form of the word other. Others is the plural form of the word other. Others’ is the possessive plural of others.

Do you use an apostrophe for others?

A: Good. So, like most singular nouns that indicate possession with apostrophe-S, so too does “other”. When teamed up with “each other” we get an example like: “The school children ate each other’s sandwiches.”

Is each other’s grammatically correct?

Each other’s is always correct, and each others’ is never correct. Think of it this way: You would say We talked to each other for hours.

Which is correct each other’s or each others?

Each other’s is always correct, and each others’ is never correct. Think of it this way: You would say We talked to each other for hours. You would never say We talked to each others for hours.

Is it each others or each other’s?

What is the difference between its or it’s?

It’s is a contraction, meaning a shorter or “contracted” form of “it is” or “it has.” (Example: It’s going to rain.) Its is a possessive pronoun meaning, “belonging to it,” or a “quality of it” (Example: The carrier lost its license) or (Example: Its color is red.)

What is the possessive of each others?

This rules out each others, as the possessive apostrophe must be there. In the case of “each other”, “other” is in the singular because it follows “each”—you wouldn’t say “each teachers” instead of “each teacher”, would you… By adding the possessive ‘s, we get the correct form each other’s.

Can its be possessive?

This is a common question. Here’s the answer: It’s is a contraction, meaning a shorter or “contracted” form of “it is” or “it has.” (Example: It’s going to rain.) Its is a possessive pronoun meaning, “belonging to it,” or a “quality of it” (Example: The carrier lost its license) or (Example: Its color is red.)

Does ‘each others’ have an apostrophe?

The apostrophe comes after the s only when the word is plural, and you would never say “each others” (even if there are a lot of people).

Do you use apostrophe in ‘each others’?

The apostrophe goes before the s, because “each” and “other” are singular. Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises. Sorry, but it must be “each other’s.” The apostrophe comes after the s only when the word is plural, and you would never say “each others” (even if there are a lot of people).

Does “others” have an apostrophe?

No apostrophe is used for personal pronouns like hers, his, its, mine, ours, theirs, whose, your, yours. Indefinite pronouns require an apostrophe, e.g. one’s lover. For other pronouns like another and others, follow the rule for singular and plural, e.g. another’s and others’.

What is the plural possessive of others?

Others is plural. The possessive of plural nouns ending with /s/ is, generally, indicated by /s’/. He always listens to others’ views. I should add, though, that the need for this particular possessive does not often arise. He always listens to the views of others.