Are kerosene heaters good for indoors?

Are kerosene heaters good for indoors?

It can heat large areas, it’s safe to use both indoors and outdoors, and it offers enough capacity to run for an impressive 14 hours. This kerosene heater can meet every need—it heats areas up to 1,200 square feet and delivers 50,000 BTUs of heating power.

Is it safe to burn a kerosene heater in the house?

Although kerosene heaters are very efficient while burning fuel to produce heat, low levels of certain pollutants, such as carbon monoxide and nitrogen dioxide, are produced. Exposure to low levels of these pollutants may be harmful, especially to individuals with chronic respiratory or circulatory health problems.

Can breathing kerosene make you sick?

Infection, shock and death can follow, even several months after the poison has been swallowed. Scars may form in these tissues leading to long-term problems with breathing, swallowing and digestion. If kerosene gets into the lungs (aspiration), serious and, possibly, permanent lung damage can occur.

Is breathing kerosene bad?

Breathing in kerosene fumes (not vehicle exhaust) may cause dizziness, drowsiness headaches. Breathing in large amounts can result in coma, loss of muscle control, heart and lung problems. Kerosene is highly flammable; it and its fumes may cause fire or explosions if not handled appropriately.

Do kerosene heaters smell?

odor. While newer kerosene heaters do not present as much of a problem, all such heaters emit a smell when they are being fueled. Odors typically cease after the heater begins burning normally.

Will kerosene fumes harm?

Breathing in kerosene fumes (not vehicle exhaust) may cause dizziness, drowsiness headaches. Breathing in large amounts can result in coma, loss of muscle control, heart and lung problems. Kerosene can cause the skin to become irritated, dry and cracked; if the skin is exposed for a long time then burns may develop.

Which is safer indoors kerosene or propane heater?

Propane is also cleaner than kerosene, and it does not emit a strong smell or too many harmful fumes common to kerosene heaters. In terms of flammability, Kerosene is not as dangerous for indoor use as propane because the spark has to come in contact with the liquid for a fire to start.